One of Europe’s largest countries, Germany encompasses a wide variety of landscapes: the tall, sheer mountains of the south; the sandy, rolling plains of the north; the forested hills of the urbanized west; and the plains of the agricultural east. At the spiritual heart of the country is the magnificent east-central city of Berlin, which rose phoenix like from the ashes of  World war II and now, after decades of partition, is the capital of a reunified Germany, and the Rhine River, which flows northward from Switzerland and is celebrated in visual art, literature, folklore, and song. Along its banks and those of its principal tributaries—among them theNeckar, Main, Moselle and Ruhr—stand hundreds of medieval castles, churches, picturesque villages, market towns, and centres of learning and culture, including Heidelberg, the site of one of Europe’s oldest universities (founded in 1386), and Mainz, historically one of Europe’s most important publishing centres. All are centrepieces of Germany’s thriving tourist economy, which brings millions of visitors to the country each year, drawn by its natural beauty, history, culture, and cuisine (including its renowned wines and beers).

Germany is the fourth most popular destination among international students in the world. More than thirteen percent of students at German universities in 2018 came from all over the world – just like you. Germany is an attractive place to study and German university degrees are highly respected by employers worldwide. 

Now question is How to apply to study in GERMANY?

1. Choose a university 

So, you’ve decided on Germany as your study abroad destination – now it’s time to choose the right course and university for you. Unfortunately opportunities to study in Germany in English at undergraduate level are currently fairly limited, though there are some courses taught in both English and German (typically starting with English for the first two to four semesters and then changing to German). This allows you to study in English while improving your proficiency in German, particularly as your university may offer German language classes.

2. Check the admission requirements 

Before applying, check that your current qualifications are recognized by your chosen university. To study in Germany you need to have a recognized Hochschulzugangsberechtigung (HZB), meaning ‘higher education entrance qualification’.

For prospective undergraduate students, a high-school diploma, school-leaving certificate or university entrance exam result is usually sufficient.

You’ll also need to check the language requirements. Most courses are taught in German, requiring international applicants to submit proof of proficiency in the German language. Two main tests are available for this purpose: the Deutsche Sprachprüfung für den Hochschulzugang (DSH, meaning “German language examination for university entrance”) and the TestDaF.

Likewise, if your course is taught in English, unless you are a native speaker or have previously studied in English, you will need to prove your knowledge of the language with a test such as IELTS OR TOEFL Universities will usually state the score/s they require on their websites.

3. Get your finances in order 

In order to fulfill student visa requirements, you will need to show proof that you have, or have access to, around € 10332 to cover your living costs, although you may find you need more, depending on your lifestyle and spending habits (the average student spends €850/US$975 a month). Living costs also vary depending on the location; according to Mercer’s Cost of Living Survey, Munich is currently the most expensive city in the country.

If you’re concerned about costs, there are scholarships available to support students studying in Germany at various study levels.

4. Apply!

For most subjects, you can apply directly to the international office of the university. 

At many German universities it’s possible to apply for admission twice a year – to commence studies either in the winter or summer semester. In general, applications for winter enrolments need to be made by 15 July, and applications for summer enrolments by 15 January. However, application deadlines vary between institutions, and the same institution may set different deadlines for each program – be sure to carefully check the specific dates for your chosen course. 

It’s recommended to submit applications at least six weeks before the deadline, to ensure time for corrections or additions if any information is missing. 

5. Take out health insurance 

Before you leave your home country you should ensure you’ve purchased health insurance to cover you during your stay in Germany. This is required both before you enroll and before you get a student visa and/or residence permit. If you’re a resident of a country within the EU or EEA, there should be a social security agreement in place between your country and Germany.

6. Get a German student visa 

The requirements for obtaining a student visa for Germany depend on your country of origin. You can find an overview of the countries for which a student visa is or isn’t required on the Foreign Federal Office’s website. 

7. Find accommodation 

Once you’ve gained a place on a course and your student visa (if applicable), it’s advisable to start looking for accommodation, as unfortunately most German universities do not offer accommodation to enrolling students.

8. Settle in to student life in Germany 

Congratulations, you should now be (mostly) all set to begin your studies in Germany! Don’t forget to pack all the essentials as well as arranging a few more important affairs:

  • If you haven’t already, once you’ve found accommodation you must register with the local registration office of your city (Einwohnermeldeamt or Bürgeramt). Once registered, you’ll receive a document confirming your registration at that address, which you can then use for the next step…
  • Get a student bank account. Most banks offer these for free, and it will make managing your regular payments (such as accommodation) much easier.
  • If you’d like to find a part-time job while you study, you can find out how this works for EU and non-EU students here

If you’re worried or unsure about anything, ask for help from the counsellor of RED Embassay. we will be happy to help you.

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